Shihan Arun Dogra

  • 7 Dan Black Belt form USKU Japan
  • 5 Dan Black Belt KAI (National Karate Body)
  • 5 Degree Black Belt Kickboxing (IAKO)

"Shotokan (松濤館) is a style of karate, developed by Gichin Funakoshi (1868–1957) and his son Yoshitaka Funakoshi. Gichin was born in Okinawa and is widely credited with popularizing "karate do" through a series of public demonstrations, and by promoting the development of university karate clubs. Funakoshi had many students at the university clubs and outside dojos, who continued to teach karate after his death in 1957. Today there are many "Shotokan school", but they all bear Funakoshi's influence. As the most widely practiced style, Shotokan is considered a traditional and influential form of karate do.


Shotokan training consists of three parts: kihon (basics), kata (forms or patterns of moves), and kumite (sparring). Techniques in kihon and kata are characterised by deep, long stances that provide stability, enable powerful movements, and strengthen the legs. Shotokan is regarded as a dynamic martial art as it develops anaerobic, powerful techniques as well as developing speed. Kumite (fighting) techniques are practised in the kihon and kata and developed from basic to advanced levels with an opponent.


Gichin Funakoshi laid out the Twenty Precepts of Karate (Niju kun) which form the foundations of the art. Within these twenty principles, lies the philosophy of Shotokan. It was Funakoshi's belief that through karate practice and observation of these 20 principles, the karateka would improve their person The Dojo kun lists five philosophical rules for training in the dojo; seek perfection of character, be faithful, endeavor to excel, respect others, refrain from violent behaviour. These rules are called the Five Maxims of Karate. Funakoshi also wrote: "The ultimate aim of Karate lies not in victory or defeat, but in the perfection of the character of the participant."